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Question:1. What is the law of conservation of Matter 2. What is the law of conservation of Mass and how does it differ to the law of conservation of Matter 3. Who founded the law and how/why did s/he do it 4. How did this discovery help scientists in today's world Please help me

Answers:1 / 2 The law of conservation of mass, also known as principle of mass/matter conservation is that the mass of a closed system (in the sense of a completely isolated system) will remain constant over time. The mass of an isolated system cannot be changed as a result of processes acting inside the system. A similar statement is that mass cannot be created/destroyed, although it may be rearranged in space, and changed into different types of particles. This implies that for any chemical process in a closed system, the mass of the reactants must equal the mass of the products. 3. Beginnings of the theory of conservation of mass were stated by Epicurus (341 270 BC). Describing the nature of the universe, he wrote: "the sum total of things was always such as it is now, and such it will ever remain," and that nothing is created from nothing, and of the conservation of mass was stated by Nas r al-D n al-T s (1201 1274) during the 13th century. He wrote that a body of matter is able to change, but is not able to disappear. The principle of conservation of mass was first outlined clearly by Antoine Lavoisier (1743 1794) in 1789, who is often for this reason referred to as an initiator of modern chemistry. However, Mikhail Lomonosov (1711 1765) had previously expressed similar ideas during 1748 and proved them by experiments. Others who anticipated the work of Lavoisier include Joseph Black (1728 1799), Henry Cavendish (1731 1810), and Jean Rey (1583 1645). 4. Once understood, the conservation of mass was of great importance in changing alchemy to modern chemistry. When chemists realized that substances never disappeared from measurement with the scales (once buoyancy effects were held constant, or had otherwise been accounted for), they could for the first time embark on quantitative studies of the transformations of substances. This in turn produced ideas of chemical elements, as well as the idea that all chemical processes and transformations (including both fire and metabolism) are simple reactions between invariant amounts or weights of these elements.

Question:1. What is the law of conservation of Matter 2. What is the law of conservation of Mass and how does it differ to the law of conservation of Matter 3. Who founded the law and how/why did s/he do it 4. How did this discovery help scientists in today's world Please help me

Answers:law of conservation of matter - a fundamental principle of classical physics that matter cannot be created or destroyed in an isolated system, it is merely transformed from one form to another. The law of conservation of MASS/MATTER is the same thing just two different names. Check out the wikipedia link i gave. Its very helpful. 3. Read HISTORY on Wikipedia link. 4. Although mass is always conserved, it is NOT conserved in a NUCLEAR reaction, since in a Nuclear reaction, mass is converted to ENERGY via Einsteins equation E=mc^2. I am a chemical engineer and I use the law of conservation of mass and energy everyday. If I know the mass going into my system, then no matter what chemical reactions take place I will always know the mass coming out of the system. For simplification: If i have a pipe going into a boiler, with water and I measure the mass of liquid water coming out, I can instantly calculate the amount of steam I am producing: Mass in = Mass out Total water in = Liquid water out + Steam Therefore Steam = Total water in - Liquid water out

Question:Thats the questiosn for my geog h/w. We have to do a powerpoint with 6 slides about it. Im not really sure what you have to write. Thanks xxx

Answers:it's simple no one wants to live there so the biosphere is conserved naturally.


From Youtube

A Culture of Conservation: Don't Call it Dirt - A Passion for Soil

Soil is made up of air, water, mineral particles, organic matter and organisms. It takes thousands of years for rock to develop into soil and hundreds of years for rich organic layers to build up. Keeping soil in place is only the beginning of soil conservation. In this video, we will review how far we have come and explore what needs to be done to preserve this precious resource. We also will look at how soil affects us and our productivity. How do we continue to maximize the land's output without diminishing the soil's natural capacity? Created to accompany the video series, these two publications serve as additional resources for educating youth about the importance of our natural resources. Enhancement Activities for 6-9th grade students: www.extension.iastate.edu Enhancement Activities for high school/junior college students: www.extension.iastate.edu For more information contact the Iowa Learning Farm at (515) 294-8912, Email: ilf@iastate.edu, Web: www.extension.iastate.edu

A Culture of Conservation: Water is Life

With less than once percent of the Earth's water accessible and available for human consumption, this video reminds us how important clean water is to our bodies, our communities and our Earth. All the water that will ever be exists right now in the Earth's biosystem. The Earth's water is in constant motion - the process known as the hydrologic cycle. How much are we willing to change our lives to ensure the water we use is clean, pure and readily available and affordable to all? Created to accompany the video series, these two publications serve as additional resources for educating youth about the importance of our natural resources. Enhancement Activities for 6-9th grade students: www.extension.iastate.edu Enhancement Activities for high school/junior college students: www.extension.iastate.edu For more information contact the Iowa Learning Farm at (515) 294-8912, Email: ilf@iastate.edu, Web: www.extension.iastate.edu

Conservation of Energy and Work

Physics homework example showing how to calculate the work done on an object using kinetic energy (from initial velocity) and potential energy (from height). This tutorial is an excerpt from the "Topic 5 - Work and Energy" lesson in a complete course in Physics Homework Examples (including 27 topics and 230 tutorials in all topics of Physics) available on www.PhysicsVodcasts.com.

GOOD Transparency: Water Conservation

Thirsty? So is everyone else. We're headed for a water shortage. Here's how simple daily choices can reduce your water use. A GOOD Transparency video. Direction and Design by Fogelson-Lubliner Music by Dim Dim


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